Exodus 21:20-21

This week’s crazy Bible verse(s) comes from the Book of Exodus.

“Anyone who beats their male or female slave with a rod must be punished if the slave dies as a direct result, but they are not to be punished if the slave recovers after a day or two, since the slave is their property.” – Exodus 21:20-21

Let’s begin analyzing this verse by ignoring the fact the Bible condones slavery.  Some Bible apologists argue the Bible doesn’t really mean slavery but means it as indentured servitude.  In my view indentured servitude is not much better, but I digress.

The first part of the sentence makes perfect sense.  If you beat your slave, you will be punished.  A crime was committed and a punishment was given.  All is good…if the sentence ended there.  Instead, the Bible goes on to say that if the slave recovers within a day or two, the criminal is not punished.  What…the…hell?!?!?!

The Bible, written by man, but supposedly inspired by God, tells us it is okay to beat your slave as long as you don’t kill your slave.  If you were beaten and in the hospital for two days, that’s a serious beating.  The Bible condones this beating!!!  Many Christians argue you can’t be moral without God.  God says it is okay to beat people as long as you don’t kill them.  That’s the moral you live by?  That’s the moral you want to pass along to your children?  WOW!!!

I think it’s safe for me to say that I am a much MORE moral person for NOT following the Bible.

15 thoughts on “Exodus 21:20-21

  1. “I think it’s safe for me to say that I am a much MORE moral person for NOT following the Bible.”

    The text states a matter of fact: a person’s property is his own. Whenever this becomes untrue, then theft, even by government, becomes acceptable.

    A reader might infer from the text that it is OK to beat a slave senseless, but the Bible has made its intended meaning clear: “for he is his money.”

    The Pharisees of Jesus’ time cited the law for personal advantage, while failing to show compassion for their fellow man. (Matthew 12:9-12)

    In like manner, Bible critics today will cite the Law to brow beat people of faith, even to the point of spiritual death, while declaring themselves to be compassionate.

    It is not appropriate to spare the rod for wrongdoing. It is also inappropriate to punish a slave in a manner that is not just.

    Colossians 4:1 Masters, give unto your servants that which is just and equal; knowing that ye also have a Master in heaven.

    Like

  2. Honestly…. What’s this nonsense? “Instead, the Bible goes on to say that if the slave recovers within a day or two, the criminal is not punished. What…the…hell?!?!?!”

    The fact that you’re overreacting about this really says something. The former case is if he dies, then he’ll be avenged (יֻקַּ֔ם), meaning, he’ll be stoned to death. In the second case after a day or two, he’s standing, (Clearly given by the Hebrew word עָמַד), then the Servant shall not be avenged, because the servant never ended up dying. There is no indication that he ended up dying. So what do you find wrong with this? Sure, he ended up beating him badly, but I for one would think you would find stoning a guy to death when he didn’t even kill his servant, to be a stretch, yea?

    The end of the verse ends with: כִּ֥י כַסְפּ֖וֹ הֽוּא׃. Which translates to: For he money/silver. So all It’s saying that because he stands, the master cannot be stoned to death on the matter that he’s still the money of the master ; As he makes the master his money. They still hold bonds to him, which can only be severed if the Hebrew person either ran away, or his time working for him was up after six years.

    “God says it is okay to beat people as long as you don’t kill them.”

    For a blog titled critical thinking, you sure do have a very shallow knowledge of what’s happening. The mid to latter half of Exodus 21 is dealing with cases of IF they happen, and giving a punishments on such cases. Exodus 21:20-21 deals with what shall happen to a master if either of the two cases expire under beating, it does NOT say anything about you’re allowed to beat them as long as they don’t die.

    Like

    1. I’m overreacting to the book from which Christians get their moral authority…the same book that condones slavery…the same god that says it is okay to have slaves. Sorry. I’m not overreacting. You are the one lacking critical thinking.

      Like

      1. You’re overreacting about this particular passage, and warping it into something that it doesn’t say. Now, are you actually going to reply to anything that I said, instead of just saying I’m the one lacking critical thinking?

        Like

      2. “You worship a deity and a book that supports slavery.”

        Aww, it’s adorable that you just assumed that.

        How many times must I repeat myself, before you stop saying irrelevant things. I’m responding to THIS particular article on you saying that this passage is saying you’re allowed to beat slaves as long as they don’t die, and you’ve failed once more to respond to anything that I’ve said. Which just shows you aren’t thinking all that critically. Until you actually respond to what I said, then I’m not going to engage in this discussion any further.

        Like

      3. “Anyone who beats their male or female slave with a rod must be punished if the slave dies as a direct result, but they are not to be punished if the slave recovers after a day or two, since the slave is their property.” – Exodus 21-20:21

        The Bible clearly states you can be your slave without being punished as long as the slave recovers. These are the morals the Bible and those who worship the Bible support.

        Like

  3. OK, Not only have you once more fail to respond to my comment, despite me repeating myself multiple times over to do so, I’m beginning to think you didn’t even READ my comment. I’m not going to repeat myself anymore, because it appears that you will once more keep ignoring what I say. Bye.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s